The Catholic Church in Scotland wants to help tackle homophobia in schools

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The Catholic Church in Scotland said they will support the Time For Inclusive Education campaign.

The Catholic Church in Scotland said they will support the Time For Inclusive Education campaign.

The Catholic Church in Scotland has indicated that they will help in the fight to curb homophobia in the classroom.

Time For Inclusive Education (TIE), a campaign for LGBT-inclusive education in Scottish schools, has said that the Catholic Church in Scotland is willing to help them in their mission.

TIE have been working to introduce teacher training in schools across Scotland to tackle homophobia in the classroom.

A spokeswoman for the Scottish Catholic Church said, “The Church is working with the Catholic Head Teacher association to ensure that all teachers have adequate knowledge, understanding, and training and feel confident in addressing all aspects of relationships education, including LGBTI matters, in an appropriate and sensitive way.”

The campaign has already received the support of a host of cross-party politicians; including Scottish Liberal Democrats leader Willie Rennie, co-convener of the Scottish Green Party Patrick Harvie and Conservative MSP Oliver Mundell.

SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon launches the Scottish National Party manifesto at the Edinburgh International Climbing Arena, EICA Ratho, on April 20, 2015 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Although Labour have rejected a coalition with the SNP, Sturgeon is expected to unveil policies that could lead to a power-sharing deal.

SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon launches the Scottish National Party manifesto at the Edinburgh International Climbing Arena, EICA Ratho, on April 20, 2015 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Although Labour have rejected a coalition with the SNP, Sturgeon is expected to unveil policies that could lead to a power-sharing deal.

During a parliamentary debate following the massacre in Orlando last month, party leaders vowed to act swiftly on the campaign’s calls for LGBT inclusion.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon also reaffirmed her support for the TIE campaign at the debate saying: “I don’t want to live in a country, yet alone be First Minister of a country, where any young person has to feel that, somehow, because of their sexual orientation or gender identity, they are subject to judgement or made to feel in any way less than any other individual in our society.

“I have given a commitment to working with the campaign for inclusive education.”

The Catholic Church’s support comes after the Church of Scotland voted to allow ministers to be in same-sex marriages in May, and also after homophobic stickers were found around Glasgow late last month.

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